Scorecard

My Score Card

 

Blog Task Description of Task Points Point tally
1. ·   Reflect on the national curriculum for computing. Write 200 words each on your computing strengths and weakness. Outline your learning objectives for this Computing. Define one concept of computational thinking, with examples of activities you might use to teach the concept. Plus a short summary of a government document. 200 200
2. ·   IPads and apps. Description of session. Include photographs of, useful ICT web links related to theme of apps and iPads. Or links to resources to support the use of iPads in classroom practice. 200 400
3. ·   Animation. Clear and reflective description of how you produced the animation and the learning opportunities. Photographs of the session or royalty-free/acknowledged copyright images illustrating the process of creating the animation. Useful ICT weblinks related to theme of animation. Resources to support classroom practice. 200 600
4. ·   E-Safety. A clear and reflective description of some of the issues of safe use of technology earning. Photographs of the session. Useful ICT weblinks as discussed in the lecture focusing on keeping children safe while using technology. Resources to support safe use of technology. 200 800
5. ·   Interactive Whiteboards. Clear and reflective description of how to use an interactive white board to support learning. Photographs of the session. For example upload screen shots of your resource as you produce it. Useful ICT weblink resources. Resources to support. 200 1000
6. ·   Website review. Think about the criteria you would evaluate the website by. Look at the site in depth. Investigate the resources. Use some of the tool. Explore some of the activities. Once you have investigated the site produce a review of the website discussing. The type of platform/website it is? Is it a free or subscription site? What age range can it be used for? The basic functionality of the website, is it a site that children use tools to create, or are there activities for the children to progress through. Ease of us for example can a child use it with no adult input, is there a management system for keeping children’s progress recorded. Make suggestions of how this program can be used to support any part of the curriculum. List two things you like about the website, why is this? List two things you feel could work better, why is this? 200 1200
7. ·   Beebots. Reflect on the activity you have produced during the session for the Beebot. Upload pictures and or video of the activity, and the map you created. Explain your activity discussing. How could you make it better? How could you use this activity with the children in a key stage 1 classroom? How could you extend your activity. What would children need to know before starting the activity? How could you simplify the activity? What would be the next step? Mention observations of use during school experience. 200 1400
8. ·   Computer programming. Visual programming- Logo patterns and the Hour of Code. Use photos from the session, link to national curriculum. 200 1600
9. ·   Scratch. Use photos from the session. Link to national curriculum. 200 1800
Badge Tasks Complete four at 100 points each. Additional points can be achieved by participating in the collection of different Computing badges. These are all different skills and tools for the classroom many teachers are exploring. You may work on as many different badges as you would like to.    
· School Experience ICT Badge. Make a note of the computing resources available for you to use within your school. Take photographs of any computing displays around the school.   Create a record of all the computing activities you undertake during your School Experience. 100 1900
· Pinterest Badge. Make four boards using the tools within Pinterest. Each board must have around 12 to 15 different pins. Share your board on a social media website (i.e. Facebook or Twitter). 100 2000
· Twitter Badge. Sign up for a Twitter account, which will be your professional Twitter account. Send your first tweet. Take a photo from one of the sessions and tweet the photograph. Find an educational quote or image about the use of technology and tweet this in a tweet. Tweet above 10 different tweets around the theme of computing and ICT. 100 2100
· E-Safety Awareness Badge. Type in ‘e safety digital citizenship posters’ into Google and then browse the different images of posters, which have been created to remind children of behaving well whilst online. Analyse the posters and note down the key points all the posters have in common. Create an e-safety poster for children then upload the image on a blog post. 100 2200

 

 

Scorecard

My Score Card

 

Blog Task Description of Task Points Point tally
1.       Session Blog Post 1 Initial thoughts on Computing and Computational Thinking 200 200
2.       Session Blog Post 2 iPads in the Classroom 200 400
3.       Session Blog Post 3 Animating 200 600
4.       Session Blog Post 4 E-Safety 200 800
5.       Session Blog Post 5 Interactive Whiteboards 200 1000
6.       Session Blog Post 6 Purple Mash Website Review 200 1200
7.       Session Blog Post 7 BeeBots 200 1400
8.       Session Blog Post 8 PurpleMash coding & Logo 200 1600
9.       Session Blog Post 9 Scratch 200 1800
10.   Paperwork 200 2000
Badge Tasks
·         Pinterest Create multiple education themed Pinterest boards. 100 2100
·         Twitter Create a professional Twitter account 100 2200
·         Facebook Review school FB pages 100 2300
·         Apps in Education Review free educational apps 100 2400

Scratch – Task 9

In this week’s session, we looked at Scratch.

scratch3

This software is related to programming, a tool that we looked at in KS2 Computing. It is very similar to Hour of Code in which you must choose what steps to use and which order you would like them to run.

Firstly, I discovered that for the sprite to move, you need to insert the ‘when *green flag* clicked’ block. I played about with changing the number of steps that the sprite can move.scratch1

I then looked at the range of actions that the sprite can do under command, and they were categorized into sections such as: motion, looks, sound and events.

scratch

I then did a sequence of events for the sprite to carry out and experimented with the ‘repeat’ block and the ‘turn’ block. I think this would be useful for children in helping them understand the importance of getting the order of a sequence correct. If they can learn to do this, then they will be able to get the desired effect they are looking for.

scratch2

This is related to the National Curriculum for Computing in KS2: ‘use sequence, selection, and repetition in programs; work with variables and various forms of input and output’.

This online PDF is very useful for teachers that do not know how to work Scratch. This can be useful for them to read before teaching a session on the particular programming software. The PDF provides clear instructions along with pictures so that anyone can learn how to use Scratch.
http://d.umn.edu/~sivelab/project/learningToCode/Getting-Started-Guide-Scratch2.pdf

Neve

Computer Coding

In todays session we were looking at the different types of online games and software that are easily accessible to help teach children the theory behind programming. The way to explain to children what coding is, is by describing it as a language that a computer uses to complete the commands that we give it.

Today we looked at various websites including 2Go which is an online website with lots of resources and games that are free to use to help children understand different concepts such as coding. This website is a very simple use of coding much like the bee-bots that I discussed about in a previous blog. You have a character and using the arrow keys, you choose which decoration to move the bee-bot in and also using the number keys which determine how far the character will move in that direction. When you tell the character to move a line will appear behind the character so that the children can see the journey that they’ve made the character go on. A feature of this website is that the children would be able to change the background they are playing in which gives them an extra sense for of ownership over the coding programme.

The next coding programme we explored was Purple Mash and within that Logo. I would argue that is a more sophisticated level of coding so is much more suited to KS2. You use the arrow as the sprite and using coding or Logo language as the commands you can make detailed patterns or tiles as you can see below!

The ‘Hour of Code’ website advocates and supports a lot of learning that covers a lot of the curriculum for ICT and it can be found at this link; https://code.org/ . The advantage of this website is that on a page you can click a button called “show code” which shows you how the computer is coded and what different moves require similar or different types of commands. Another advantage of this website is it slowly builds up the children’s knowledge of programming with small steps by using games or films that they will have heard of. This includes Angry Birds, Frozen and the latest Star Wars film.

As you can see in the above pictures of the Star Wars game, the coding progressively gets harder and builds upon what the children learn in earlier stages so that they learn about more complex coding than they would in the game on 2Go.

Thank you for reading!

Miriam

Scorecard

Blog Task Description of Task Points Point tally
1. Initial thoughts on ICT 200 200
2. The use of iPads in the classroom 200 400
3. Animation 200 600
4. Digital Citizenship and

E-Safety

200 800
5. The use of interactive whiteboards in the classroom 200 1000
6. Online Task – Website Review 200 1200
7. Key Stage 1 Computing 200 1400
8. Key Stage 2 Computing 200 1600
9. Scratch 200 1800
10.
Badge Tasks      
· Pinterest Badge 100 1900
· Twitter Badge 100 2000
· School Experience ICT Badge 100 2100
· E-Safety Awareness Badge 100 2200

Scorecard

Blog Task Description of Task Points Point tally
1. Initial thoughts on ICT 200 200
2. The use of iPads in the classroom 200 400
3. Animation 200 600
4. Digital Citizenship and

E-Safety

200 800
5. The use of interactive whiteboards in the classroom 200 1000
6. Online Task – Website Review 200 1200
7. Key Stage 1 Computing 200 1400
8. Key Stage 2 Computing 200 1600
9. Scratch 200 1800
10.
Badge Tasks      
· Pinterest Badge 100 1900
· Twitter Badge 100 2000
· Apps in Education Badge 100 2100
· E-Safety Awareness Badge 100 2200

Scratch

In our seminar last week, we briefly looked at a programming software called Scratch on the iPads. This week, we developed this further by exploring Scratch on the computer.  The program is free to use at https://scratch.mit.edu and is designed for children to use as it simplifies coding into blocks that are easy to use.

The children have a vast range of different characters to choose from and keep them engaged.The variety also allows for the software to be linked to the curriculum, for example, when studying the ocean as a habitat, the children can create an ocean themed Scratch animation using the different sprites.  choose a ‘sprite’ and give commands for the sprite to carry out, such as ‘move 10 spaces’ and ‘turn 90 degrees’.

Screenshot 2016-03-13 14.42.18

The computer program gives a wider range of functions to use, such as making sounds or changing costumes, whereas the app ‘Scratch Jr’ is more restricted. However, the app is a good starting point to introduce children to the software and to coding.

Screenshot 2016-03-13 14.35.13

The children also have the option to change the background that their sprites are on. This can help when the children are creating their own stories or habitats as they can either choose a background, upload an image, or design their own background using the paint software embedded in the scratch program.

Screenshot 2016-03-13 14.49.18Screenshot 2016-03-13 14.50.59

These websites offer a range of ideas for using scratch in the classroom:

https://scratch.mit.edu/educators/

http://www.educationworld.com/a_tech/scratch-programming-classroom-activity-ideas.shtml

http://www.literacyfromscratch.org.uk/teaching/introduction.htm

E-Safety Awareness Badge

For this badge, we were asked to look up e-safety awareness posters that show children how to be a ‘digital citizen’. There were many different poster designs all describing how children can stay safe online, such as acrostics and mindmaps. Some key points that the posters put forward to children were:

  • Do not share personal information online such as your full name and address.
  • Think about what you say as it may be hurtful to others.
  • Don’t talk to or meet up with people you don’t know.
  • Be careful accepting files or opening emails from people you don’t know as they may contain viruses or nasty messages.
  • Stay secure by choosing a safe password and changing it often.

Screenshot 2016-03-13 12.25.27.png

We were then given the task of creating our own posters advertising how children can stay safe online:

Screenshot 2016-03-13 13.07.10.png

E-Safety Awareness Badge

There are many posters to inform children about being safe on the internet. You will see posters like these in most schools, showing that eSafety is an important matter and that every child should be aware of the risks of ‘going online’.

Most of the posters I looked into were in acrostic form, such as ‘S.M.A.R.T’ or ‘I.N.S.A.N.E’. I think this is a good feature because it will help children remember the tips that the posters are trying to give about eSafety.

esafe3

I really like the design of this poster and think it will catch the attention of children’s eyes. It highlights the five most important steps to take when using the internet and I have decided to make a poster similar to this one.

This is my eSafety Poster:
posterNeve