Using Scratch

Scratch is  a free programmable toolkit that enables pupils to create animations, games, quizzes, etc. The eventual creations can be shared over the internet. The knowledge builds on the language used in Logo, but also uses new ideas and capabilities to make things easier for children to programme: it is much easier for children to move blocks of code than typing lines of code.

I started by choosing a sprite and background, then looking at using arrow keys to control a sprite, using controls to turn the sprite and move 10 steps, as shown below. This worked okay, however it looked strange with the rocket sprite because it registered turning left in relation to the side of the sprite not the top. This made the movement look strange and so I chose to start again and use a different sprite.

Scratch 1

Below is an image of my attempt to create a background. I was determined to make a simple maze that a sprite would have to go around without bumping into the walls. Below is the screen used when drawing the background and the image below is my coding to make the penguin move around the screen.

Scratch 2

Scratch 3

Below is the coding I created to ensure that the penguin would start in the middle when the start button was clicked. The image below that shows that the maze was just a background and the penguin sprite could actually just walk over it – defeating the object of the game!

Scratch 4Scratch 5Scratch 6

Above is my final game, the penguin can no longer hit a wall without being taken back to the start. In my next project I discovered that if you programmed the sprite  to go in the opposite direction when hitting a colour that does the same thing as having solid walls. For example if the sprite goes forward 10 and hits a coloured wall: if you programme the sprite to move back 10 when touching that colour the outline will stop the sprite from moving through, creating a ‘wall’. Below is my coding for sprites in a new maze game, however this one has an aim. I wanted to make the two fish sprites go around the square, circulating like guards and for the starfish to move around with the aim to collect treasure.

Scratch 8Scratch 7

I continued with this game when I got home so that I could share it on here, I altered the design of the ‘ball’ sprite so that it appeared like a gold coin. I programmed the starfish to do multiple things when hitting the fish, it will say ‘Oh no!’ and change appearance to a sad starfish before returning back to the start. It is quite challenging to move around the screen because the rocky maze is harder to get past due to the irregular edges. When the starfish hits a coin the coin has been programmed to move to a new spot. Below is the coding for the starfish and the coin.

Scratch2Scratch

Feel free to have a go at my finished game. I didn’t spend too much time on it at home so there are some improvements that could be made! I feel like I really understand the basics of Scratch and could debug the processes easily (with only some confusion!).

Here is the game link: https://scratch.mit.edu/projects/100605533/

Thanks for reading (and playing!)

Jack

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